Krisensha- An Aloha Medical Mission Photo Essay

***Originally Posted on Ka Hui Ho’olauna Page***

During the first day of the mission, Debbie and I met a young woman who came in the hospital with a bump above her spine. It was diagnosed as a Lipoma- a benign tumor composed of fatty tissue. Her name was Krisensha Ramos, a mother of three girls who came in with her longtime friend. Ramos’s husband worked as a construction worker and like most people in Tuguegarao, could not afford the surgery that would have required thousands of pesos. Since the surgery dealt with her spine, the surgeons decided it would be better to perform the lipoma extraction the following day. The next day, we followed her through the operating room.

Krisensha Ramos with Aloha Medical Mission General Surgeon, Margaret Lee. Lee is a 76-year old surgeon who had done hundreds of surgeries for a variety of medical missions around the world.
A view of a majority of the Lipoma that was extracted from Krisensha’s upper spine.
With the help of a local nurse, Dr.Lee slowly separates the fatty tissue from the skin.
With the help of a local nurse, Dr.Lee slowly separates the fatty tissue from the skin.
A local nurse trainee watching Dr. Lee perform the surgery. The operating room consisted of two surgeries occurring at the same time. Local Nurses and Volunteer nurses on the Mission worked together to do as much surgeries as possible.
Ramos on the Operating Room. She was awake thorough the whole process.
Local Philippine nurses and volunteer nurse trainees helping move surgical lights in the operating room. Local Philippine nurses and volunteer nurse trainees helping move surgical lights in the operating room.
Dr. Lee showing us the Lipoma.
A local nurse showing Ramos the Lipoma.
DSCF0038Dr. Lee posing with Ramos and her lifelong friend after the surgery.

 

Bobby Bergonio- Demo Reel

My name is Bobby Bergonio and I’m a Multimedia Journalist with previous experience at Hawaii News Now as their Spring SPJ-Intern and Staff Writer at KaLeo Newspaper. Through these experiences, I have learned a lot about writing articles, scripts, and the art of interviewing.

During my last year in college, a colleague and I were fortunate enough to travel to the Cagayan Province in the Philippines for a story on the Aloha Medical Mission. We recorded hours of footage for our show “Ka Hui Ho’olauna,” in the Philippines and also wrote a freelance article for Hawaii Business Magazine in the process. This demo reel includes news packages and anchor segments from the shows.

Enjoy!

Philippine Healthcare- Ka Hui Ho’olauna Show 14

Featured on Ka Hui Ho’olauna, a Television-Magazine Production brought to you by the School of Communications and students from the Journalism Department at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

I was fortunate enough to be sent with another student to Tuguegarao City in the northern province of Philippines funded by scholarship, to do a story on the Aloha Medical Mission, a non-profit organization that performs surgeries, dental procedures, check-ups and free medicine distributions for those less fortunate.

We also were given the opportunity to do a freelance article for Hawaii Business Magazine, on top of two segments featured on Ka Hui Ho’olauna.

LINK: hawaiibusiness.com/Hawaii-Business/April-2014/Aloha-Medical-Mission-Heals-the-Poor-in-the-Philippines/

Margaret “Yeu-tsu” Lee Story- Ka Hui Ho’olauna Show 13

Featured on Ka Hui Ho’olauna- a Television-Magazine Production brought to you by the School of Communications and students from the Journalism Department at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

I was fortunate enough to be sent with another student to Tuguegarao, Philippines by the Moulton Foundation to do a story on the Aloha Medical Mission. The video centers around Margaret “Yeu-Tsu” Lee, a Veteran General Surgeon part of the Aloha Medical Mission.

We were also given the opportunity to do a freelance article for Hawaii Business Magazine, on top of two segments featured on Ka Hui Ho’olauna.

LINK: hawaiibusiness.com/Hawaii-Business/April-2014/Aloha-Medical-Mission-Heals-the-Poor-in-the-Philippines/

Mission of Mercy

Aloha Medical Mission

My colleague Deborah Manog and I were fortunate enough to go to Tuguegarao, Philippines during our Spring Semester- thanks to scholarship provided by the UH-Manoa Journalism Department- and documented the Hawaii-based non-profit organization, Aloha Medical Mission. We spent a week documenting surgeries, medical consultations, and even a live-birth! Truly testing our abilities as journalists.

Art can be a job

Art Job

***Originally published in KaLeo Newspaper****

Bobby Bergonio, Staff Writer

Designers and artists entering the job market face a daunting task, but the Iwilei Creative Program strives to be the big break that these students need. This free three-month program is a creative incubator for designers to meet and build relations with professionals in the business.

Graphic designers Matt Heim, Scott Kawamura and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa alumnus James Charisma have collaborated on this project to help artists gain experience and knowledge of the industry. Sumner LLC, in association with HonBlue and Electric Pencil, will allot a portion of their Nimitz facility to house the incubator and allow students a conference room, individual workspaces and a creative bullpen.

“We wanted design students to hone their own skills and meet local industry contacts, which can be potential clients and potential employers,” Charisma said.

PROMOTING ART, INSTILLING PROFESSIONALISM

The Iwilei Creative Program will accept four to eight students to participate in weekly workshops and collaborate with designers, writers and photographers in order to develop their talents in marketable ways. Not only will they utilize their artistic skills, but the students will also learn many business concepts – from budgets to cost projections – to be mindful of the costs and profits of the creative industry.

“A lot of time, people have experience in Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Suite, but they don’t necessarily have experience working with a budget or working on a timeline and turning the creative process into a marketable business,” Charisma explained.

Graduates of the program will not only gain valuable work experience and certification, but also a network of professional contacts – experts who may be able to provide direction and employment.

FROM PAPER TO PRODUCT

Designers will also help launch “Abstract,” a local arts and culture magazine aimed toward 18-35-year-old college students and post-graduates. According to Charisma, “Abstract” will mainly focus on the “ever-changing contemporary urban landscape of Hawai‘i.”

Students of the program will be in charge of its production from start to finish, creating content, developing layouts, choosing fonts and adjusting colors. They will experience the trials and triumphs that designers, writers or photographers face as they bring the magazine to publication.

A launch party for “Abstract” will be held in March and give students a chance to network with potential clients, associates and future employers while gaining sponsorship for the publication to self-sustain in the future.

“The magazine really is just a pride that comes out of it,” Charisma said. “The main thing is to create an incubator to help educate the next new generations of design students.”

For more information on the program, contact Charisma at james.charisma@yahoo.com.

Link: http://www.kaleo.org/features/art-can-be-a-job/article_e130e428-7730-11e2-96ff-001a4bcf6878.html